The Ginger People Coupons Help Nonprofits

ginger

All-natural ginger in products from The Ginger People pack taste pizzazz and a host of health benefits that range from calming an upset stomach to boosting the immune system. Five new coupons from CommonKindness.com help ginger fans save money at the grocery checkout while funding their favorite nonprofit organizations.

The Ginger People is giving fans of the bright and zingy Asian spice more reasons to try their healthful ginger products, with five new money-saving coupons downloadable from the free online grocery coupon leader CommonKindness (www.commonkindness.com). Every coupon redeemed saves customers money on their coupon purchases, while generating funds for the nonprofit organizations of their choice.

“Ginger is widely used as a spice and as an ingredient in many food and medicinal items all around the world—including my own household,” said Sarah Schloemer, president of CommonKindness. “The Ginger People and their innovative products are perfect additions to the CommonKindness family of like-minded companies working to improve the world one coupon at a time.”

All-natural ginger-based products from The Ginger People are available in many surprising forms, including low-calorie ginger candies, ginger syrup, ginger spread, sweet chili sauce, and a liquid ginger soother—good in mixed adult beverages and as a hangover cure the next morning.

“We are very pleased to partner with CommonKindness, inviting people to try our inventive ginger products, rewarding our loyal customers with savings, and helping them support their favorite charities,” said The Ginger People spokesperson Melissa Cruz. “Everyone is a winner.”

The Ginger People are offering coupons for the following five products:

Gin Gins Original Chewy Ginger Candies (aka Original Ginger Chews) 
Surprisingly and satisfyingly spicy—and known as the only candy that bites back—Gin Gins are America’s best-selling ginger candy and the winner of the Fiery Food Association’s Scovie Award for “Best Candy.” With their queasy-quelling properties, Gin Gins are great for fending off nausea while flying, boating, or driving on a winding road trip.

Containing 10% fresh ginger – more than any other ginger candy = Gin Gins are also great as a healthy snack to help support losing weight or quitting smoking.

Ginger Soother Tonic

Ginger contains over 25 powerful antioxidants and is known to help relieve sore throat pain and headaches, warm internal organs, and ease nausea—including sea sickness. Many use The Ginger People Ginger Soother as a tonic to treat colds and flus, as a mixer for innovative drinks, and—ironically—as a remedy for hangovers.

Ginger Soother cocktail hour libations include:

Organic Ginger Syrup 

Something new to spice things up at the breakfast table, The Ginger People Organic Ginger Syrup is a kicky alternative to traditional pancake syrup or agave sweetener for coffee or tea. It also adds a unique twist to many recipes.

Suggested servings:

  •     Flavor sparkling water to create a tasty non-alcoholic beverage.
  •     Add it to warm water (and brandy if you please) as a soothing nightcap.
  •     Glaze roasted carrots, chicken, pumpkin, and yams.
  •     Top ice cream for an unusual and interesting dessert.

Ginger Spread 
Sweetened ginger served with aged Gouda has been a traditional hors d’oeuvre in Holland for centuries. The Ginger People now bring this flavor treat to America. Ginger Spread is made from young stem ginger that is steeped in cane sugar syrup and ground to a fine paste.

Suggested servings:

  •     Layer Ginger Spread onto thin slices of pear and aged Gouda, Manchego, or Cheddar cheese for an impressive yet simple appetizer.
  •     Swirl Ginger Spread through yogurt, crème fraîche, cream cheese, or whipped cream.
  •     Spread over toast, crumpets, or scones.
  •     Spoon into a warm bowl of oatmeal.
  •     Add to a fruit smoothie.
  •     Lace through a fresh fruit salad.

Sweet Chili Sauce 
Inspired by the spice markets of the Far East, The Ginger People’s Sweet Ginger Chili sauce combines the flavors of sweet red peppers with the heat of ginger and chilies.

Suggested servings:

  •     Drizzle over grilled jumbo prawns, crab cakes, burgers, or salmon.
  •     Glaze roasted chicken and pork chops.
  •     Serve as a dipping sauce with spring rolls and pot stickers.
  •     Blend with cream cheese to create a simple yet sensational topping.

To find and use coupons for The Ginger People snacks, go to CommonKindness.com, fill in the easy sign-up form, then designate your favorite nonprofit from the user-friendly directory. Then select printable grocery coupons for items you typically use or want to try, print them, and head to the store.

For each coupon shoppers redeem, CommonKindness will donate 20% of its distribution fee to nonprofit groups of the shoppers’ choice.

About CommonKindness
CommonKindness is the new online grocery coupon site that operates on the principle of kindness and aims to benefit consumers, nonprofit organizations, and brands. CommonKindness is revolutionizing the online coupon industry by eliminating coupon loading and change costs, charging brands only for coupons redeemed, and donating 20% of its revenue to nonprofit organizations chosen by CommonKindness shoppers.

To learn more, go to http://www.CommonKindness.com or call (415) 887-9537.

About The Ginger People 
As America’s foremost supplier of all natural ginger ingredients and home to the most award-winning ginger brand, The Ginger People is passionate about all things ginger and committed to its virtues. With state-of-the-art ginger factories in California and Fiji, The Ginger People take pride in being the most quality-oriented and environmentally-conscious ginger producer in the world.

To learn more, go to http://www.Gingerpeople.com or call (800) 551-5382 x225.

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Teach Your Children Well

 

Whether you believe kindness comes from nature or nurture, reinforcing the importance of being kind to other people, animals and the planet is an important lesson  for many parents and educators.

The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation  inspires people to practice kindness and to “pass it on” to others. The organization provides free educational and community ideas, guidance and many other resources to kindness participants through its website

The workshop featured in this video is part of the (RAK) Education Pilot Program, teaching kids:

  • The language of kindness.
  • How to recognize areas where kindness can make a difference.
  • How to put their ideas into action.

What would the world be like if every school offered such a program as part of their curriculum?

Kindness in Education

Can kindness be taught? Do humans develop kindness naturally, or must we teach our children to be kind? If you believe that kindness is something we learn, does it have a place in academic curriculums?
We are raising and educating our children in the most competitive academic era that our global society has ever known. Applications to the right preschools now outnumber applications to universities. Middle school sports teams increasingly demand private athletic coaching to ensure a child’s placement on the team. And pressure to score high on college entrance exams has driven some students to unthinkable levels of cheating and mind stimulating drug use.
In the face of all these educational challenges, kindness actually helps our children succeed. Kindness raises students’ self-esteem and enhances the learning environment. Minds are open and available to greater memory retention in non-hostile settings. So, whether academically proficient or not, students are given a way to excel through kindness.
It’s not only struggling students who benefit from a climate of good will. During difficult or stressful times, students are empowered when they take positive action and extend kindness and support to their fellow students. Kindness encourages empathy and helps develop valuable interpersonal skills that will help children succeed in every setting throughout their entire lives.
Schools are a great place to build on the beneficial principles of kindness that our children have been nurtured with at home. And if a child has not been gifted a kind loving home, our schools are a great place to start learning about it.
On the wall of the fifth-grade classroom at Willow Creek Academy, there are pictures and writings about kindness: kindness to the earth and kindness to one another. The fifth grade students came up with the idea for the “Kindness Project” independently. The year-long project provides opportunities for students to think deeply about how to keep their classroom community friendly and safe for everyone. Meegan Devol, their teacher, has integrated kindness into reading and writing projects, and the class regularly discusses kindness in class meetings.Devol shares, “We are focusing on eliminating put-downs from our class entirely. I know some people say, ‘They’re just playing around’ or ‘That’s what kids do;’ however, if a child does not feel safe in the classroom environment, they will not take chances in the classroom and learning will suffer. Thankfully, we made it through today with only one put-down. Furthermore, many of the students gave each other compliments throughout the day. I am so proud of room 25!”
Is it possible to learn kindness at almost age or at any time during your life? The answer is yes! I was reminded of an important lesson in kindness from my son when he was only five years old. As we walked in Union Square in San Francisco on a chilly afternoon, my son generously offered his warm wooly scarf to a homeless man sitting on the edge of the sidewalk. At first, I wanted to snatch his scarf back from the man, but then I stopped to think why my son might have offered his scarf. And then I remembered the quote, “A little child shall lead them.”
Kindness is a great lesson, and not just for tomorrow’s leaders. This week we will be high-lighting standout programs and school across the country educating children on the importance of kindness. Do you know a teacher who deserves a sincere thank you?

The Kindness Diet

Fifty percent of Americans are overweight, and we spend over $40 million a year on diet programs and products to slim down and get healthy. In our society, where addiction and instant gratification rule, looking and staying young and hot is more important than maintaining good health. People are literally dying to lose weight.Humbly, I must admit, I am counted in these statistics. As a child, one of the things I learned from my father was thin = good and fat = bad. Although I was not chubby until I was subjected to these alleged facts, I was put on the Grapefruit Diet at age 10. Was that child abuse? Perhaps.
I, like billions of others, fell victim to the illusion that there is a magic pill, eating plan, hormone injection or medical procedure that will solve my weight problem and make me happy. Thin people are happier, aren’t they?
Turns out, no big surprise, that the real and lasting solution to the weight loss, health and ultimately happiness riddle is simple, free and available in unlimited supplies: kindness. Research indicates kindness to oneself and others can have a marked impact on weight loss. In one study, those who increased their efforts to be kind to everyone around them burned more white fat—the bad kind—converting it to energy and resulting in weight loss. More and more holistic health articles are popping up on the practice of kindness visualization, meditation and prayer as integral to achieving a healthy weight.  The Kindness Diet is for real and it works not only for human health but in Alicia Silverstone’sbook and blog, the health of all living beings.If nothing else, it feels good to be kind. And being the good little addict and instant-gratification-oriented human that I am, if something feels good, I want more of it. Maybe I can reframe that painful childhood lesson and change thin = good to kindness = good health.

Kindness or Codependence?

Kindness or Codependence?

One of my favorite childhood books was The Giving Tree. I wanted one so badly—an actual giving tree, I mean. Now, I was the only child in a family that was materially abundant, but emotionally bankrupt, so it’s no wonder I fell in love with this story.

As a quasi-adult in recovery from life in general, I sometimes hear people refer to the fabled Giving Tree as the Codependent Tree. This never fails to light a fire in my heart on the subject of kindness and giving versus codependent and unhealthy behavior. In the story, the boy and the tree have a very special relationship. The boy goes to the tree when he needs help, and the tree gives what it can to meet the boy’s needs. As the boy grows up, the tree grows old. In the end, the tree has become a stump, which is just what the boy, now an old man, needs to rest. The tree has given the boy everything it had to help him. It’s a beautiful thing.

In my life, people have often held back from acting kindly and giving themselves to others as a way of avoiding being codependent. Don’t misunderstand me. True codependence, of which I am admittedly inflicted with myself on occasion, can be a truly destructive and unhealthy behavior.  Many times I have heard people say they choose not to help someone in need because they “have to take care of themselves.”  Other times I have experienced friends turn away from people in the name of teaching them to be more self-reliant. I think it’s the humanness and neediness that repels them because it triggers internal feelings of need and discomfort.

So where is the line? When does kindness become codependence? When are we holding back from opening our hearts to another because their pain scared us? When are we protecting ourselves and others from unhealthy and dysfunctional dependencies?

Until I find the answer for myself, I will keep my heart open to giving and receiving kindness to the best of my ability. When I start cutting my arms off for people, I will re-evaluate.

Perform 2 Acts of Kindness and Call Me in the Morning

The results are in: kindness promotes a longer and healthier life. It’s like the ultimate happy pill. But unlike drugs, addiction to kindness is good for you.

Scientific research shows that being kind is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Performing kind acts can significantly improve mental, emotional and physical health, and even helps diminish symptoms of physical diseases and psychological disorders. In his book, The Pleasure Prescription, Dr. Paul Pearsall writes: “In concrete terms, there seems to be a biological reward for doing the right thing. It is not necessary to carry out major acts of kindness to gain the health benefit. In fact it has been found that brief, small, regular acts of kindness yield the highest health benefits.”

According to Allan Luks and Peggy Payne in their book The Healing Power of Doing Good, kindness:

  • Promoted optimism
  • Heightens our sense of well-being, and can even bring on a euphoric state
  • Increases energy levels
  • Decreases feelings of loneliness, depression and helplessness
  • Increases sense of connectedness with others
  • Helps achieves a greater sense of calmness and relaxation
  • Enables better weight control
  • Reduces symptoms of insomnia
  • Strengthens the immune system
  • Reduces pain
  • Improves circulation and reduces high blood pressure and coronary disease
  • Improves digestion
  • Relieves arthritis and asthma
  • Increases recovery  from surgery
  • Reduces cancer activity

A participant in Luks’ research relates his story: “Some months ago I was so stressed out that I could barely get four hours sleep at night, and I had all sorts of aches and pains. I had even tried antidepressant and anti-anxiety drugs, but to no avail. I then found out first hand that it is love that truly heals. When I do nice things for others, I definitely feel a physical response. For me it is mostly a relaxation of muscles that I hadn’t even realized had been tensed. I can now sleep well at night, and most of my aches and pains have disappeared.”

So why does kindness make you feel so good? There are two reasons. The first is that performing acts of kindness takes our mind off our own problems. The second is that while performing an act of kindness, our bodies reward us by triggering the release of endorphins, an endogenous opioid peptide that gives us a sense of exhilaration and wellbeing, helps reduce the intensity of pain messages sent to the brain, and boosts our immune systems.

There is one important catch. In order to benefit from a kind act, we must do it without expectations. If we expect recognition and the act of kindness is not acknowledged or appreciated, we might end up feeling angry or disappointed. In this mindset, the chemical benefit is lost. The negative feelings cause cellular inflammation, which is actually damaging to our health.

Like other things that impact our health, kindness is contagious. It has a ripple effect. When people receive or observe kindness, they are inspired to be kind themselves. In effect, when we choose to do a kind deed, we are actively helping reduce world tension by starting the healing process one person at a time. It begins with us.