Do You Want a Kind or an Unkind Future?

 

If you want to change the world and have your own personal impact on our future, then always be a little kinder than necessary.

Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for kindness.

Does kindness make the world a better place? Could our acts of kindness warm the coldness of other people’s lives?

In our mobile-global society, people across the planet are linked together via the Internet, satellite communications, social networking and even international products.

Could a network of person-to-person kindness eventually connect the world in a meaningful way?

The best person to answer your travel questions or guide you through the process of creating the perfect pasta sauce might be several thousand miles away, but still within your immediate access, ready to offer valuable advice, thanks to technology.

But is the opposite also true? How did you feel when the friend you met for coffee keeps incessantly checks her text messages? Is it possible to have love and compassion for all humankind without engaging in visible deeds of kindness with the people you are engaged with around you?

Try thinking about it this way. Do not ask me to be kind, just ask me to act as though I were kind. What do you think our future might look like if we all “acted” as if we were kind?

Reaching out to others with the intention to serve and no expectation of return rewards you with a sense of power and influence over situations that might appear out of your control. You are no longer a victim of an unfortunate circumstance.

An act of kindness is never insignificant. Kindness is manifestations of strength and resolutions.

Renowned psychotherapist and author Brené Brown, Ph.D., LMSW writes,  “Cruelty is never brave—it’s mostly cheap and easy, especially in today’s culture.”

Dare to be part of the brave new world. Be kind.

Great Leadership is About Human Experiences, Not Processes

leadership flow chart

Leadership is not so much about technique and methods as it is about opening the heart. Leadership is about inspiration—of oneself and of others. Great leadership is about human experiences, not processes. Leadership is not a formula or a program, it is a human activity that comes from the heart and considers the hearts of others. It is an attitude, not a routine.

More than anything else today, followers believe they are part of a system, a process that lacks heart. If there is one thing a leader can do to connect with followers at a human, or better still a spiritual level, it is to become engaged with them fully, to share experiences and emotions, and to set aside the processes of leadership we have learned by rote.

The quote above is from an Industry Week article by Lance Secretan, who is an advisor to leaders, a public speaker, and a recipient of the International Caring Award.

Are corporate leaders who hold internal processes in higher regard that their customers’ experiences, as Moses might say, worshiping false gods?

Do Good Bosses Get Good Results?

Kindness in corporate America

In the book, Leading with Kindness: How Good People Consistently Get Superior Results, authors William F. Baker and Michael O’Malley Ph.D. promote the idea that nice guys finish first.

They argue that kindness is much more than the give and take of benefits for supposed loyalty. Leaders who demonstrate sincerity, honesty and concern build more respect and get the most from their people.
Honesty, they say, is not merely about leaders telling the truth, it is equally important to be good at listening to the truth. In addition to creating an atmosphere of inclusion, executives who do not learn this skill can be blindsided when everything falls apart.
I like the concept, but I am still curious. What does a kind boss do that makes them so great?